Archive for April 2004

Fantastic Flying Discs

An amazing collection of the art of the flying disc or frisbeetmvia [Delta Tango Bravo]

There were only 3000 charcoal HDXs ever made? Sheesh, I had like 10 of ‘em; they were my favorite disc when they came out.

OPML import for OneNote

If you have OneNote 1.1 preview installed, you can now import OPML outlines.  …. The source and executable are located here.  via [Better Living Through Software]

Nice. Works for me.

Live on a thumb drive?

With USB drives of 128-256MB now commodities, is it possible to carry your: Internet Favorites, My Documents, Outlook .pst and Outlook settings on your keychain? The real question is whether its possible to either:

  • set the appropriate user directories to a drive that disappears when the flash drive is removed, or
  • use a utility to do this at the press of a button

Anyone know? I’m currently splitting my time between 6 computers and keeping “authoritative” files is kind of a hassle (the big deal, of course, is Outlook). And, anticipating the “Use Exchange” suggestion, I use my server-class machines to evaluate OS’s; I can’t dedicate one to be a W2K3 Server 24×7.

Suggestions?

The OneNote API: Hints Only

Donovan Lange has posted the first concrete info on the OneNote Service Pack API. Unfortunately, he doesn’t quite give enough details for even a hacking attempt: we’ll need the XML schema that describes import data and how to construct the GUID required by the “navigate to page” function.

Microsoft and The World Poker Tour

There’s a show called World Poker Tour. Every week they show the final table of 9 players from a tournament in which a couple of hundred people compete. Week after week, this is what you see:

  • A small elite of tournament pros who get to the final tables time after time
  • One or two representatives from a larger cadre of professionals who probably end up in the money, but not at the final table, of most tournaments they enter
  • “Amateurs” who are good poker players, but for whom luck almost certainly played a major role in getting to the table

Now, I’m not saying the amateurs are just lucky. For all the “two minutes to learn,” premise of the show, it isn’t trivial to calculate evolving odds on pots valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars without the slightest tell. And week after week, it’s shown that an a talented amateur with good cards can beat the most fearsome player with bad cards.  

Which brings us to Microsoft.

Scoble is having a blog-versation with Microsoft Monitor‘s Joe Wilcox centering on Adobe CEO Bruce Chizen’s sleeping habits: whether Chizen should “stay awake at night” worrying about Microsoft (Wilcox’ stand) or sleep easy and exult in the morning’s fresh crop of new Windows customers.

I don’t give a hoot about how CEO’s of multi-hundred million dollar corporations sleep. I care about how entrepreneurial developers sleep. Or, to go back to our analogy with the World Poker Tour, I care about the amateurs trying to get to the final table.

Microsoft is like one of the tournament pros who appear at the final table time and again. Let’s say Phil Hellmuth, who’s a notorious trash-talking egotist who’s behavior at the table is calculated to intimidate and irritate people into poor play. Yes, if you’re considering “entering the tournament,” you should have an idea of how to play when this fearsome competitor has you in the sights. If it comes down to you and this competitor, good luck. If, on the other hand, your goal is simply to end up in the money you’re nuts to let fear keep you out of the game. Absolutely nuts.

You know Microsoft’s hand for years to come! Microsoft will “play” Whidbey, Yukon, Longhorn, and Office. If you make, say, a 3D modeling tool you will face fierce competition for the pot, but it won’t be from Redmond. It’s like knowing that Phil Hellmuth will be dealt a straight, a flush, and three of a kind: there may be some doubt as to the exact quality of the hands, but you will know their cards and their fundamental character and they will not know yours.

Microsoft will act like a poker pro: they will hint that they might Assimilate You, they will hint that they might Crush You Like A Bug, they will move their chips towards the pot and see if you sweat or smile. They will analyze you. And then you know what they’ll do? They’ll offer to buy you out of the tournament. They don’t do this on WPT, but it happens all the time in real gambling tournaments: everyone makes their “expected value” calculation, talks about it rationally, and an arrangement is made.

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There was more here, but I decided to cut out the gung-ho stuff. Gambling, whether in a poker tournament or entrepreneurially, isn’t for everyone and if you need some geeky Weblog to bolster your courage, it’s probably not the right choice for you.

 

 

Cruel and Unusual Music

From the AP wire:

FALLUJAH, Iraq – In Fallujah’s darkened, empty streets, U.S. troops blast AC/DC’s “Hell’s Bells” and other rock music full volume from a huge speaker, hoping to grate on the nerves of this Sunni Muslim city’s gunmen and give a laugh to Marines along the front line.

…What music would you play to drive an enemy (or cube mate) crazy? I’m thinking that AC/DC, albeit grating and annoying, isn’t quite enough to be truly cruel….Some nice Britney Spears, perhaps… via [/\ndy’s Weblog]

I wonder if part of it isn’t using music that’s grating but culturally acceptable to your own troops as an echo / background. (“Hey, Guns N Roses is next!”) But if you just want to drive them insane, I’m thinking a Celine Dion loop ought to do it.

NCollection

This is quite interesting. Open source Implementations of the missing data structures of the FCL: linked list, doubly linked list, tree, skip list, heap, etc… Focus is made on robustness, standard conformance, documentation and testing of the collections.  via [Sam Gentile’s Blog]

So the cool kids have moved away from calling it the Base Class Library and now call it the Framework Class Library, is that right? (Gotta’ have the lingo down to run with the cool kids…)

Longhorn Sample: RSS Reader (Like, Out Loud)

Jason Nadal has posted an RSS reader that uses the Longhorn text-to-speech APIs to actually read you the morning news while you do other things. Includes sourcevia [Marquee de Sells: Chris’s insight outlet]

I love sample code that is actually helpful…

Web Wizards, without the mess

via William Bartholomew:

Fritz Onion has posted an interesting article about how to write ASP.NET projects without using Web Projects and the associated bindings to IIS etc.

http://staff.develop.com/onion/Samples/aspdotnet_without_web_projects.htm

TTFN – Kent

I’ve had this post in my aggregator for two months.

Win32 to .NET Cross Reference

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